RIDER Institute Q&A


DRACO Q&A – the following Questions (Q:) were asked by several of you who completed the provided form. All answers following the “A:” were written by Dr.Rider.

Q: Judging by the slow pace of FDA drug approval, is there a way to get a more blanket-like approval for concurrent trials of the DRACO method for different diseases?

A: That is a very interesting idea, but before we can get to questions about FDA approval, we need to test and optimize DRACOs against major clinically relevant viruses in cells and in animal experiments.

Q: First of all, thanks for your passion and hard work to help make the world a better place to live. I would like to know if DRACOs can address infections of unknown or unidentified viral or retroviral adventitious agents like SV40, BLV, XMLV, etc. therefore it could be a possible complimentary treatment for people with remittent breast cancer (BLV), acquired neuro immune dysfunction (XMLV), other cancer types (SV40) Thanks!

A: Thank you very much for your support. In principle, the DRACO approach should be effective against virtually any virus. Of course, DRACO would need to be tested against each virus to actually confirm that, but I would love to see that happen.

Q: When are results for tests of DRACO on herpes projected to be available?

A: If we can raise enough funding, it should take about a year to restart DRACO production and testing, and then we hope to test and optimize DRACOs against herpesvirus after that.

Q: Crowdsourcing is OK, but going slowly. Why not seek large philanthropists, NIH?

A: We have been and continue to seek funding from philanthropic foundations, NIH, and other sponsors. However much money is raised via crowdsourcing is very important for buying equipment and supplies to continue the work, hopefully in conjunction with funding from other sponsors.

Q: Why don’t you apply to pets, or livestock to demonstrate safety, efficacy, or Ebola, Zika?

A: We have been and continue to seek funding to develop DRACO for animal applications.

Q: Not scientific, but how positive are that draco with be a cure; 1 to 10, 10 being yes, 1 being no cure. Have you considered, 2nd question, I am sure MIT has an endowment have you put any thought about looking for funds there. 3rd question, so you have a grant writer to help you get grants. 4th, Your invention seems to be next “grail”, developers should be clammering to help you. 5th, the USA seems to be a captured market, would you consider doing research outside. 6th, any thought to open-source. 7th, if dracos development does no come to fruition have you thought of what to do with your research, if God forbid happens. Maybe distribute to separate concerned parties. 8, have you done face to face with congressmen, or state congressmen.

A: There is definitely some risk that scientific or financial obstacles will prevent DRACO from ultimately being used. However, I am personally convinced that DRACO should be an effective approach, due to the large number of DRACO designs, methods, and contingency plans I have that could deal with various scientific difficulties if they arise. As far as funding, I have been and continue to pursue a wide variety of possibilities.

Q: I hope the best for you.

A: Thank you very much!

Q: Do know or have you heard of viruses connected to Alzheimer’s?

A: There are still many aspects of Alzheimer’s disease that are not well understood, and researchers have certainly raised the question of whether there might be a viral component to the disease.

Q: Have you considered changing your focus to curing livestock.

A: We have been and continue to seek funding to develop DRACO for animal applications.

Q: Just wondering, If you were going to study the effect of how DRACOS will cure herpes in clinical trials(I know it is a long ways away), how you would tell if it was working. Considering blood tests look for antibodies, which an infected person will have, even after the virus is gone, and swab tests only look for virus in open legions/sores. I know this will apply to all herpes cure research, but am curious how that would work, as there is no easy way to tell, other than do a nerve biopsy on an infected subject. I could see it working for HIV, as that can be found in the blood, which is a minimal risk to collect, where as nerves are a completely different story. I know based upon your previous research in cells, that it has appeared to work, at least on what you have tested against so far. I am not a scientist, so I dont know how accurate the information is, but I think that it would be awesome to have a cure for one of the most stigmatised STIs out there, even considering that up to 80% of the population has HSV-1, and about 20% have HSV-2. Just for practical reasons such as testing wouldn’t it make more sense to attack HIV first?

Being a more deadly disease, over a disease that causes “Mostly” harmless, but painful blisters/sores, on the body, make it more clinically relevant. Not saying herpes shouldnt be cured, just trying to figure out why someone would be more likely to back a viable herpes cure over a viable HIV cure? Also if this worked, would DRACOS be used to vaccinate someone from a virus like hiv or herpes, if the were say injected with the virus, then cured after the immune system has started creating antibodies? Just thinking like with current sufferers of things like herpes, it is really hard to catch the same strain somewhere else on the body, so if it were cured, the immune system would still know what it was, and kill it before it took hold. Another question is, for viruses like herpes, which resides in nerve cells, that pretty much act like other nerve cells, until the herpes "Comes out to play", if you distroy those cells, could there be serious nervous system damage, and how long would it take for your nerves to go back to normal? Also another thought, as you are looking for more media backing to get the news out, have you tried reaching out to charlie sheen? He was really supportive of the LELO HEX condom on indegogo, and is really trying to make people more aware of sexual health, which from what I am reading about DRACOs the next trials are going to be on herpes, which falls in line with that.

A: Those are a lot of very good questions. In principle, the DRACO approach should be able to deal with all of those issues, although experiments are the only way to really test and optimize to know that for certain. That will depend on how much funding is available, and we are exploring all possible leads.

Q: If the crowdfunding does not generate enough money, what will you do?

A: However much money is raised via crowdsourcing is very important for buying equipment and supplies to continue the work, hopefully in conjunction with funding from other sponsors.

We have been and continue to seek funding from philanthropic foundations, NIH, and other sponsors.

Q: Is anyone else working on the DRACO system?

A: Currently it is just me, although I have a network of people to offer advice and support. If enough funding can be raised, I hope to rebuild a scientific team to produce, test, and optimize DRACO in experiments.

Q: Why haven’t more people from academia promoted this initiative?

A: I have presented the DRACO approach and results at a large number of national and international academic conferences. The other scientists were very enthusiastic and supportive, but further progress depends on whether sponsors will fund the experiments.

Q: Why don’t you focus on one virus at a time? Maybe HSV2 which is something most supporters have issues with? Also- if you don’t reach your goal? Will another campaign go on? I think 6 months is more realistic for higher goals. What will you do with what we’ve already donated?

A: However much money is raised via crowdsourcing is very important for buying equipment and supplies to continue the work, hopefully in conjunction with funding from other sponsors.

We have been and continue to seek funding from philanthropic foundations, NIH, and other sponsors. How many viruses we can test will depend on how much funding is available.

Q: Can DRACO reverse cells before an autoimmune reaction cause them to be self-destruct? (Such as ADH or Beta Cells in the Islets of Langerhans in the Pancreas, et al)

A: I am very curious to explore whether DRACO could be used for a wide variety of applications, but experiments are necessary to arrive at those answers, and it all depends on how much funding is available.